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Category: Sport of the day (page 1 of 3)

From the Military to the Streets: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Using obstacles such as buildings and environmental structures, freerunning is not just a sport but a form of expression. Freerunners interact with these obstacles, performing various moves. These commonly include flipping and spinning. Some movements are adopted from sports such as gymnastics and breakdancing, but new moves can also be created.

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Motor Racing and its Future for the Disabled: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Motor racing has a variety of categories, including Formula, sports car, stock car, and off-road racing to name just a few. While each has their differences, the high speeds and competitive aspects of these adrenaline-packed races all create a similar buzz, which many competitors live for.

The sport has existed ever since cars were invented, with  races recorded as early 1867: these competitions began as reliability trials for new cars, to prove that they were suitable modes of transport. By the 1930s, cars specifically designed for racing had developed.

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Diving into Underwater Hockey: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Underwater hockey, also referred to as Octopush, is essentially a game of hockey played on the floor of a swimming pool. Two teams go head-to-head to move a move across the bottom of a pool with a hockey stick; the aim being to get the puck in the opposing team’s goal.

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Chess that Packs a Punch: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Chessboxing, as suggested by the name, combines two very contrasting pastimes in alternating rounds: chess and boxing. While the board game tests the athletes’ mental ability, the boxing tests the physical.

The sport was invented by a Dutch performance artist, Iepe Rubingh. Originally, chessboxing was thought to be an art performance, but it soon turned into a competitive sport. Currently, it has gained most popularity in Germany, the United Kingdom, India and Russia.

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Bowled Over by Boccia: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Boccia is one of only two Paralympic sports to not have a counterpart in the Olympics. A sport related to bowls, boccia sees athletes with severe physical disabilities taking part. In 1984 it was introduced to the Olympic Games and although it was originally designed for athletes with cerebral palsy, it is now played by athletes with many other disabilities affecting motor skills.

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Surf Lifesaving and its Upcoming Events: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Surf Lifesaving is a competitive sport, which combines aspects from both surfing and lifeguard services. The skills required in this sport replicate those needed to save a life whilst also improving fitness and confidence.

The sport evolved from the training carried out by Australian and New Zealand lifesavers and is still based on these volunteer clubs who perform rescue duty. Although the sport is still mainly popular in just Australia and New Zealand, competitions now exist in five regions in Canada and in Europe the sport is continuing to develop.

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Get Your Skates On: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

Speed skating is a competitive form of ice skating which involves competitors racing on the ice. There are different distances to compete at: long track speed skating, short track speed skating and marathon speed skating. The standard rink for long track is 400 meters long, but sometimes shorter tracks are used.

The first sign of speed skating can be traced back over a millennium to Scandinavia, Northern Europe and the Netherlands, where natives added bones to their shoes and skated across frozen bodies of water. Ice skating is thought to always have been an activity of joy rather than transport.

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Fencing and its Future: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Fencing, one of the first sports to ever appear in the Olympic Games, has three forms in the modern game. These forms include foil, épée and sabre and each uses a different kind of weapon. Competitive fencers usually specialise in one of these weapons, but the foil is generally regarded as the best weapon to begin learning with.

Derived from duelling, fencing originally emerged from the development of sword fighting for self-defence. The sport is played on a strip (2m by 12m long) and the aim is to score ‘hits’ or ‘touches’ on your opponent using one of the three weapons. These touches are recorded electronically by the players body wires because of how fast-paced the action is.

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Women’s Football and its Aim for Equality: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Football, or soccer, is the largest growing sport being played by women around the globe, with major national and international competitions enabling female footballers to play at professional level. But how bumpy was the road to professionalism in women’s football? And how does football for men and women compare today?

One of the first European teams was founded by Nettie Honeyball in England, 1894, and was called the ‘British Ladies’ Football Club’. It was this team which helped to influence many women to take up the sport. However, they didn’t have everybody’s support. When women’s football first emerged, it wasn’t accepted by the British football associations as they believed this rise posed a threat to the game’s ‘masculinity’.

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Down to Earth: Sport of the Day

Ailsa Harvey

 

Falling through the sky from a plane, at an average speed of 120mph, skydiving is unsurprisingly considered an extreme sport. The sport involves freefalling; gradually accelerating to reach terminal velocity. A parachute is deployed when closer to the ground and in cases of World Record attempts this requires great cognitive strength and quick thinking.

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