Household-vs-business wastes in Scotland during the last decade

Screenshot of the graph of household-vs-business cases in Scotland during the last decade

This graph provides an at-a-glance-comparison between Scotland’s households and businesses in respect of the yearly amounts waste that they have generated during the last decade.

The household:business ratio has been very approximately 2:3, but waste from businesses has been reducing noticeably over the decade.

Using a literate programming tool to generate content

Literate programming tools weave data, code, visualisations and natural language into a flowing narrative. These tools are often used to construct tutorial-style documents that are based on tractable/generatable material.

For us, this sounded like a promising approach as a way to generate content since, one of our aims is to develop (website situated) how-to guides/tutorials based on the tractable waste datasets. So we created our first tutorial-style document using this approach: A walk-through on how to extract information from the data about business waste in Scotland. Here’s a screenshot of it:Screenshot of our first document generated using a literate programming tool

It uses:
Only minimal mark-up and programming code was required (see its source file), and it has proved to be a handy means to generate a data-based tutorial.

Annotating data points on our prototype website

On our requirements list is, to weave interest-based navigation maps through our data site. And feedback from the recent SODU 2021 conference, affirmed this:

I like the site’s tools and visualisations, but more needs to be done to help me navigate my path of interest through the prototype website.

In an exploratory step towards fulfilling that requirement, we have annotated some data points with explanations/narrative. The idea is that that these annotations could become waymarks in navigation maps, to guide users between the datapoints which underpin data-based stories. We might even imagine how clicking a ‘next’ button on a waymark would visually ‘fly’ the user to the next datapoint in the story (which is, perhaps, on a different graph or different page). But(!) back to our present, very simple proof-of-concept implementation…​

Here’s how the annotations look in our present, proof-of-concept implementation:

Annotations plotted on Inverclyde’s household waste generated graph

Each annotation is depicted by an emoji which is plotted beside a datapoint (on a graph, or in a table). When the user hovers over (or clicks on) an annotation’s emoji, a pop-up will display some informative text.

We want to code annotations just as we would any other dataset – as a straighforward CSV file. So we have built a data-drive annotation mechanism. This has allowed us to specify annotations, as data, in a CSV file like this:

Annotations specified in a CSV data file

Each annotation record contains datapoint coordinates which specify the datapoint against which the annotation is to be plotted. The datapoint coordinates include a record-type which specifies the dataset against which the annotation is to be plotted. (In this example, the specified dataset household-waste-derivation-generation is a derived dataset, based on the household-waste and population datasets.)

This proof-of-concept, data-driven, annotation mechanism has been useful because it has:

  1. given us a model with moving parts to learn from,

  2. provided hints about how annotations can be used to help users understand and navigate the data,

  3. shown us that we need more structure around the naming and storage of derived datasets (and their annotations), and

  4. uncovered the difficultlies of retro-fitting an annotations mechanism into our prototype-6 website. (Annotations are displayed using off-the-shelf Vega-lite tooltips and Bulma CSS dropdowns, but these don’t provide a satisfactory level of placement/control/interactivity. More customised webpage components will be needed to provide a better user experience.)

Building linked open data about carbon savings

linked open data for carbon savings

We have written a research report which walks through how we might build linked open data (LoD) about carbon savings from dissimilar data sources.

It outlines (using small samples from the datasets) how the data pipeline that feeds our prototype-6 webapp, works.

Building LoD about carbon savings - research report - coversheet

“What are my neighbours putting into their bins?!”

What do households put into their bins and and how appropriate are their disposal decisions?

To help provide an answer to that question, Zero Waste Scotland (ZWS) occasionally asks each of the 32 Scottish councils to sample their bin collections and to analyse their content. This compositional analysis uncovers the types and weights of the disposed of materials, and assesses the appropriateness of the disposal decisions (i.e. was it put into the right bin?).

Laudably, ZWS is considering publishing this data as open data. Click on the image below to see a web page that is based on an anonymised subset of this data.

household waste analysis

The Fair Share – the CO2e saved by this university based, reuse store

Discover how many cars worth of CO2e is avoided each year because of this university based, reuse store

The Fair Share is a university based, reuse store. It accepts donations of second-hand books, clothes, kitchenware, electricals, etc. and sells these to students. It is run by the Student Union at the University of Stirling. It meets the Revolve quality standard for second-hand stores.

The Fair Share is in the process of publishing its data as open data. Click on the image below to see a web page that is based on an draft of that work.

The Fair Share

The prototype’s architecture – revised

“Trialling Wikibase for our data layer” described how we evaluated the use of Wikibase as a key implementation component in our bi-layer architecture. The conclusion was that Wikibase, although a brilliant product, does not fit our immediate purpose.

In our revised architecture…​

Wikibase is replaced with (dcs-easier-open-data) a simple set of data files (CSV and JSON) hosted in a public repository (GitHub). These data files are generated by the Waste Data Tool (dcs-wdt). Together, dcs-easier-open-data and dcs-wdt implement the architecture’s data layer.

In the architecture’s revised presentation layer, the webapp reads (CSV/JSON formatted) data from the dcs-easier-open-data respository, instead of reading (via SPARQL) data from the Wikibase.

The prototype’s bi-layered architecture - revised

Stirling’s bin collection data – revisited

Stirling Council set a precedent by being the first (and still only) Scottish local authority to have published open data about their bin collection of household waste.

The council are currently working on increasing the fidelity of this dataset, e.g. by adding spatial data to describe collection routes. However, we can still squeeze from its current version, several interesting pieces of information. For details, visit the Stirling bin collection page on our website mockup.

“How is waste in my area?” – a regional dashboard

Introduction

Our aim in this piece of work is:

to surface facts of interest (maximums, minimums, trends, etc.) about waste in an area, to non-experts.

Towards that aim, we have built a prototype regional dashboard which is directly powered by our ‘easier datasets’ about waste.

The prototype is a webapp and it can be accessed here.

our prototype regional dashboard

Curiosities

Even this early prototype manages to surface some curiosities [1] …​

Inverclyde

Inverclyde is doing well.

Inverclyde’s household waste positions Inverclyde’s household waste generation Inverclyde’s household waste CO2e

In the latest data (2019), it generates the fewest tonnes of household waste (per citizen) of any of the council areas. And its same 1st position for CO2e indicates the close relation between the amount of waste generated and its carbon impact.

…​But why is Inverclyde doing so well?

Highland

Highland isn’t doing so well.

Highland’s household waste positions Highland’s household waste generation Highland’s household waste % recycled

In the latest data (2019), it generates the most (except for Argyll & Bute) tonnes of household waste (per citizen) of any of the council areas. And it has the worst trend for percentage recycled.

…​Why is Highland’s percentage recycled been getting worse since 2014?

Fife

Fife has the best trend for household waste generation. That said, it still has been generating an above the average amount of waste per citizen.

Fife’s household waste positions Fife’s household waste generation

The graphs for Fife business waste show that there was an acute reduction in combustion wastes in 2016.

Fife’s business waste

We investigated this anomaly before and discovered that it was caused by the closure of Fife’s coal fired power station (Longannet) on 24th March 2016.

Angus

In the latest two years of data (2018 & 2019), Angus has noticibly reduced the amount of household waste that it landfills.

Angus' household waste management

During the same period, Angus has increased the amount household waste that it processes as ‘other diversion’.

…​What underlies that difference in Angus’ waste processing?

Technologies

This prototype is built as a ‘static’ website with all content-dynamics occurring in the browser. This makes it simple and cheap to host, but results in heavier, more complex web pages.

  • The clickable map is implemented on Leaflet – with Open Street Map map tiles.
  • The charts are constructed using Vega-lite.
  • The content-dynamics are coded in ClojureScript – with Hiccup for HTML, and Reagent for events.
  • The website is hosted on GitHub.

Ideas for evolving this prototype

  1. Provide more qualitative information. This version is quite quantitative because, well, that is nature of the datasets that currently underlay it. So there’s a danger of straying into the “managment by KPI” approach when we should be supporting the “management by understanding” approach.
  2. Include more localised information, e.g. about an area’s re-use shops, or bin collection statistics.
  3. Support deeper dives, e.g. so that users can click on a CO2e trend to navigate to a choropleth map for CO2e.
  4. Allow users to download any of the displayed charts as (CSV) data or as (PNG) images.
  5. Enhance the support of comparisons by allowing users to multi-select regions and overlay their charts.
  6. Allow users to choose from a menu, what chart/data tiles to place on the page.
  7. Provide a what-if? tool. “What if every region reduced by 10% their landfilling of waste material xyz?” – where the tool has a good enough waste model to enable it to compute what-if? outcomes.

1. One of the original sources of data has been off-line due to a cyberattack so, at the time of writing, it has not been possible to double-check all figures from our prototype against original sources.